Experiment Results

Experiment Results

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Excess Heat

Video file
Time lapse movie of several hours. The last segment of rising temperatures is when the chamber reached its maximum allowed temperature with only 7.0% of the input electrical power needed to cause such a heating of the chamber.

 

Red arrow marks the time when input power was only 7.0 % of that needed to cause the observed rise in chamber temperature.
Red arrow marks the time when input power was only 7.0 % of that needed to cause the observed rise in chamber temperature.

 

The video, shows a 2 hour history of the energetics of the chamber. The Bolometer measures the total electromagnetic output from 200nm to 6,000nm. The Thermocouple measures the chamber wall temperature. The Infrared camera is looking only at the anode. The vertical axis has been scaled to put al three on the same plot. The important part starts at the red arrow. At this point we are running at 7% of the input power needed to bring the entire chamber to the maximum safe working temperature, yet all three metrics for output energy went up to their maximum safe levels and the experiment needed to be terminated. This 7% is extremely well known, from several years of measuring the input power, the chamber temperature, and the cooling system surrounding the chamber. This 7% is also in complete agreement with CFD analysis for the input energy needed to reach max critical temperature. The time leading up this point had several runs with the max allowable input power as can be seen by all three sensors going up to the maximum safe levels for the chamber. The point at the red arrow was a lower power run with new conditions inside the chamber. All three metrics quickly rising to their max safe levels is clear evidence of excess energy production.

 

Transmutation

The anode was analyzed with EDAX after this energy producing run. The next two images highlight the elements that were not present at the beginning of the run.

 

Showing new elements found on the anode. These elements were not present before the experiment.
Showing new elements found on the anode. These elements were not present before the experiment.

 

Showing new elements found on the anode. These elements were not present before the experiment.
Showing new elements found on the anode. These elements were not present before the experiment.

 

Additional evidence for transmutation comes from optical spectroscopy. For reference, below is the spectrum from a discharge not encouraging transmutation - showing primarily the Hydrogen atmosphere.

 

Optical spectrum from discharge in a Hydrogen atmosphere
Optical spectrum from discharge in a Hydrogen atmosphere.

 

The next figure shows the spectrum of the discharge around the anode during the energy-producing run, with three areas highlighted. Spectroscopy under complex conditions is as much an art as a science, since any one line can be assigned to more than one element and energy level. One of the unique signatures of the metal Manganese is the three triplets circled below. It is possible that instead of Manganese, we are seeing multiple other elements in just the right energy levels, but that is statistically extremely less likely than the presence of Manganese. The alloy used for the anode contained no Manganese. It is also notable that the relative intensities of the nine Manganese lines indicate up to 25eV energy states, considerably higher than the energy levels in the Hydrogen atmosphere.

 

Optical spectrum during plasma discharge. The blue ovals highlight the lines attributed to Manganese. Manganese was not present in the chamber before the discharge.
Optical spectrum during plasma discharge. The blue ovals highlight the lines attributed to Manganese. Manganese was not present in the chamber before the discharge.

 

The table below shows the elements identified that were not in the chamber before the experiment.

 

Period Table highlighting the new elements found in the chamber.
Period Table highlighting the new elements found in the chamber.